Dementia in the News

Scientists studying Alzheimer's disease are increasingly finding clues that the brain begins to deteriorate years before a person shows symptoms of dementia.

Now, research on a large extended family of 5,000 people in Columbia with a genetically driven form of Alzheimer’s has found evidence that the precursors of the disease begin even earlier than previously thought, and that this early brain deterioration occurs in more ways than has been documented before.

In 1943, a Greek war veteran named Stamatis Moraitis came to the United States for treatment of a combat-mangled arm. He’d survived a gunshot wound, escaped to Turkey and eventually talked his way onto the Queen Elizabeth, then serving as a troopship, to cross the Atlantic. Moraitis settled in Port Jefferson, N.Y., an enclave of countrymen from his native island, Ikaria. He quickly landed a job doing manual labor. Later, he moved to Boynton Beach, Fla. Along the way, Moraitis married a Greek-American woman, had three children and bought a three-bedroom house and a 1951 Chevrolet.

Understanding who is most susceptible to Alzheimer's disease and developing early detection models, effective therapies and possibly a cure, is the goal of the largest single private scientific grant ever invested in Alzheimer's Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) focused on families afficted with Alzheimer's disease.

A $5.4 million contribution announced today from the non-profit Cure Alzheimer's Fund to Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) will allow state-of-the-art whole genome DNA sequencing to further understand the genetic roots of Alzheimer's disease.

A century and a half ago, French physician Pierre Paul Broca found that patients with damage to part of the brain's frontal lobe were unable to speak more than a few words. Later dubbed Broca's area, this region is believed to be critical for speech production and some aspects of language comprehension.

More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease, and the nonprofit Alzheimer's Association projects that, barring major advances, 11 million to 16 million will have it by 2050 - at an annual cost of $1.1 trillion in today's dollars. In May, the government announced the first national plan to combat Alzheimer's, and one focus is the role of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain, a leading suspect in this form of dementia. U.S.

Scientists have selected three different types of Alzheimer's drugs to be tested in the first large-scale international attempt to prevent the disease in people who are otherwise doomed to get it.

Researchers investigating a known gene risk factor for Alzheimer's dsiease discovered it is associated with lower levels of beta amyloid - a brain protein involved in Alzheimer's - in cognitively healthy older people. The findings suggest that a mechanism other than one related to beta amyloid accumulation may influence disease risk associated with the gene. The study, by researchers at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) at the National Institutes of Health, was published online September 27, 2012 in the journal Biological Psychiatry.

Teresa Gómez Isla estuvo este verano dando un curso magistral sobre la enfermedad de Alzheimer en la Universidad Internacional Menéndez Pelayo, en Santander.

Ahora, desde Boston, esta investigadora, quien ha tratado al expresidente de la Generalitat catalana Pasqual Maragall, que sufre alzhéimer desde 2007,  habla con EFEsalud para analizar esta grave enfermedad.

Scientists have discovered a system that drains waste products from the brain. The finding may reveal ways to treat neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease.

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