Dementia in the News

The Obama administration plans to spend an additional $156 million over the next two years to help find an effective treatment for Alzheimer's, a fatal brain-wasting disease that affects more than 5 million Americans.

The White House said on Tuesday it will spend an extra $50 million this year, and it will seek an extra $80 million in fiscal 2013 to bolster Alzheimer's research. Obama also plans to spend an additional $26 million in programs to support people who care for Alzheimer's patients.

Alzheimer's disease seems to spread like an infection from brain cell to brain cell, two new studies in mice have found. But instead of viruses or bacteria, what is being spread is a distorted protein known as tau.

The surprising finding answers a longstanding question and has immediate implications for developing treatments, researchers said. And they suspect that other degenerative brain diseases like Parkinson's may spread in a similar way.

I love unexpected history, in unexpected places. For instance, I always regretted that Route 128 and Silicon Valley weren't more history-minded, until former Digital Equipment Corp. executive Gordon Bell addressed that problem. He and his wife, Gwen, birthed our Computer Museum, which morphed into the bigger-deal Computer History Museum in Mountain View, Calif.

In this vein, an interesting specialty museum is about to open in the heart of Boston:  The Paul S. Russell, MD, Museum of Medical History and Innovation at Massachusetts General Hospital.


We are proud of our many accomplishments over the past year and we are very appreciative of your support. In this report, you will meet a New Hampshire couple grappling with younger-onset Alzheimer's; a Massachusetts family that has engaged as effective advocates; a man who has set up a special trust to honor his father and support our cause; and a couple who are managing the care of an elderly parent.

New research suggests that the outer edges of the brain are thinner in older people who may be destined to develop Alzheimer's disease, but there's currently no way to use the information to help people fend off dementia.

Still , the findings could help researchers test Alzheimer's medications by allowing them to track the progression of the disease, said study co-author Dr. Brad Dickerson, an associate professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School.

Representatives of the Alzheimer's Association Massachusetts/New Hampshire Chapter visited the Charlestown Navy Yard Dec 8 to present four investigators with $680,000 on behalf of the national organization. Since 1994, the Alzheimer's Association has donated $3.7 million to the MGH.

The brains of mice that Bradley Hyman keeps in his sprawling lab at an old naval base in Boston offer a window, literally and figuratively, into the mysterious damage that causes Alzheimer's disease. When each mouse reaches a few months of age, one of the lab workers carefully creates an opening in its skull and places a tiny glass window over the hole. Day after day, week after week, a powerful microscope is trained on the brain, searching for ugly clumps of sticky protein fragments like those that litter the brains of elderly people who have died of Alzheimer's.

The University of Cambridge and Elan Corporation today announced the launch of The Cambridge-Elan Centre for Research Innovation and Drug Discovery (Cambridge-Elan Centre), which will be located at the University. The Cambridge-Elan Centre will provide a highly interdisciplinary environment uniquely positioned for delivering world-leading translational research focused on innovative therapies for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. This ten-year agreement paves the way for a long-term collaboration between Elan and the University of Cambridge.

The holidays are a time when family and friends come together and share memories, laughs and good cheer. But for families living with Alzheimer's, the holidays can also be a difficult time.

Caregiving responsibilities layered on top of keeping up with holiday traditions can take its toll on Alzheimer famliies, especially the caregiver. The person with Alzheimer's may also feel a sense of loss during the holidays.

With some planning and adjusted expectations, your celebrations can be filled with joy and magical moments to cherish forever.

Adjust your expectations.

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