National Institutes of Health (December 17, 2012): A Brain Pacemaker for Alzheimer's Disease?

Publication Date: 
Mon, 12/17/2012

As many of you know, Alzheimer's is an absolutely devastating neurodegenerative disease. It destroys the lives of loved ones with the disease, takes a terrible toll on family and friends who care for them, and costs, for patient care alone, an estimated $200 billion a year.

Alzheimer's is the most common form of dementia, robbing those it affects of their memory, their ability to learn and think, and their personality. It worsens over time. People forget recent events, and gradually lose the ability to manager their daily lives and care for themselves. It currently affects an estimated 5.1 million Americans; this number is expected to rise to somewhere between 11 and 16 million by 2050 unless treatments can be found in the meantime.

There's no cure for Alzheimer's disease (AD), but biomedical researchers are testing new drugs and biochemical approaches, treatments that could stem and possibly reverse the course of the disease. They are also exploring how conditions like obesity and diabetes - which are at epidemic levels in the U.S. and worldwide - play a role. I want to tell you about a new NIH-funded experimental approach that was tried for the first time in the U.S. in November.

http://directorsblog.nih.gov/a-brain-pacemaker-for-alzheimers-disease/