Dementia in the News

May 5, 2017

Alzheimer's Association (May 5, 2017): Alzheimer's Association & AIM Lead The Way to $400 Million Federal Research Increase

The Alzheimer’s Association, the Alzheimer’s Impact Movement (AIM) and its nationwide network of advocates applaud Congress for hearing their call and taking action in the fight to end Alzheimer’s. Today, a $400 million increase in Alzheimer’s research funding was signed into law, increasing federal funding at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to nearly $1.4 billion. After years of stagnant funding, this is the second year in a row the Alzheimer’s Association request for historic funding increases has been acted on by our federal leaders.

May 3, 2017

Japan Times (May 3, 2017): In Tests Across Japan, New Tech Allows Speedy Tracking of Lost Dementia Patients

Japan’s rapidly aging society is spurring technological innovation, including the use of a tracking system designed to help families and nursing facilities locate people suffering from dementia when they lose their way or go missing.

As the country with the most aged population, Japan is poised to see its postwar baby-boomer generation — currently the biggest age demographic — form a population stratum aged 75 or older by 2025.

May 3, 2017

Harvard Gazette (May 3, 2017): To Age Better, Eat Better

A habitually healthy eater, Frank Hu stocks his refrigerator with fresh fruits and vegetables, fish, and chicken. His pantry holds brown rice, whole grains, and legumes, and his snack cabinet has nuts and seeds. He eats red meat only occasionally, rarely buys white bread, soda, bacon, or other processed meats. He’ll purchase chips and beer, but only now and then, mostly when entertaining friends.

When it comes to eating smartly in ways that can help us keep fit and live longer, Hu knows best.

April 26, 2017

Harvard Gazette (April 25, 2017): The Balance in Healthy Aging

The morning light is pouring into the senior living community in Canton, where six residents are performing an exquisite choreography of sweeping, lyrical movements, emulating their Tai chi instructor.

“Wave hands like clouds,” urges Kerry Paulhus, leading them in the classic low-impact and slow-motion exercises of the ancient Chinese martial art. With relaxing music playing in the background, the students shift their weight from one leg to the other, turn their waists, and rotate their arms as if they indeed were clouds.

April 24, 2017

Boston Globe (April 21, 2017): Biotechs Take Lead in a New Push Against Neurological Disorders

Earlier in his career, Paul Bolno worked with neuroscientists at drug giant GlaxoSmithKline PLC. Today, as chief executive of Wave Life Sciences Ltd., he is leading the Cambridge biotech’s effort to advance two experimental drugs that could become the first treatments for the progressive brain disorder Huntington’s disease.

April 19, 2017

Alzheimer's Association (April 12, 2017): FDA Approves At-Home Test for an Alzheimer’s Disease Risk Gene: What You Need to Know

Perhaps your grandmother had Alzheimer’s disease; maybe your mom or dad is currently living with the disease. You may be concerned that you are seeing signs of the disease in yourself or a loved one. Whatever the situation, if your family has been touched by Alzheimer’s, it is natural to be curious if a genetic test is valuable in predicting the likelihood of developing the disease.

April 18, 2017

Harvard Gazette (April 18, 2017): How Old Can We Get? It Might Be Written in Stem Cells

“If only,” wrote an ancient Japanese poet, “when one heard that Old Age was coming one could bolt the door….”

Science is working on it.

Aging is as much about the physical processes of repair and regeneration — and their slow-motion failure — as it is the passage of time. And scientists studying stem cell and regenerative biology are making progress understanding those processes, developing treatments for the many diseases whose risks increase as we get older, while at times seeming to draw close to a broader anti-aging breakthrough.

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