Dementia in the News

June 1, 2017

Newsweek (June 1, 2017): As Rural America Faces an Onslaught of Alzheimer's Disease, States Look to Radical Ways to Help

June Aman no longer laughs when her husband teases her, which he does fairly often. When she complains about how long it takes Dave to fix something, he says she never told him she was in a hurry. When she says he has no one else to pick on, he responds, “You poor thing.” Sometimes, he speaks about her beauty in the past tense and doesn’t correct it when she needles him about it.

June 1, 2017

Washington Post (June 1, 2017): African Americans are More Likely Than Whites to Develop Alzheimer’s. Why?

Gary Williams thought he had found a glimmer of hope. Six months earlier, his wife, Gwendolyn - 64 and a retired education professor at Bowie State University in Maryland — had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. The disease, as Gary would come to describe it, was “a slow-moving train” in their lives.

May 30, 2017

New York Times (May 29, 2017): The Earliest Signs of Brain Damage in Athletes? Listen for Them

Evidence continues to mount that professional athletes in a number of contact sports are suffering brain damage as a result of head impacts. But there is no reliable test to detect the injury, called chronic traumatic encephalopathy, in its earliest stages.

Even if a doctor strongly suspects that an athlete’s confusion or memory loss is related to C.T.E., proof can only be obtained on autopsy.

May 11, 2017

Harvard Gazette (May 11, 2017): Probe of Alzheimer’s Follows Paths of Infection

What if the bad-boy protein of Alzheimer’s disease - amyloid beta - isn’t so bad after all?

Harvard researchers found themselves asking that question several years ago after noticing remarkable similarities between amyloid beta, thought to be a major player in the disease’s progression, and proteins active in the body’s immune system.

May 5, 2017

Alzheimer's Association (May 5, 2017): Alzheimer's Association & AIM Lead The Way to $400 Million Federal Research Increase

The Alzheimer’s Association, the Alzheimer’s Impact Movement (AIM) and its nationwide network of advocates applaud Congress for hearing their call and taking action in the fight to end Alzheimer’s. Today, a $400 million increase in Alzheimer’s research funding was signed into law, increasing federal funding at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to nearly $1.4 billion. After years of stagnant funding, this is the second year in a row the Alzheimer’s Association request for historic funding increases has been acted on by our federal leaders.

May 3, 2017

Japan Times (May 3, 2017): In Tests Across Japan, New Tech Allows Speedy Tracking of Lost Dementia Patients

Japan’s rapidly aging society is spurring technological innovation, including the use of a tracking system designed to help families and nursing facilities locate people suffering from dementia when they lose their way or go missing.

As the country with the most aged population, Japan is poised to see its postwar baby-boomer generation — currently the biggest age demographic — form a population stratum aged 75 or older by 2025.

May 3, 2017

Harvard Gazette (May 3, 2017): To Age Better, Eat Better

A habitually healthy eater, Frank Hu stocks his refrigerator with fresh fruits and vegetables, fish, and chicken. His pantry holds brown rice, whole grains, and legumes, and his snack cabinet has nuts and seeds. He eats red meat only occasionally, rarely buys white bread, soda, bacon, or other processed meats. He’ll purchase chips and beer, but only now and then, mostly when entertaining friends.

When it comes to eating smartly in ways that can help us keep fit and live longer, Hu knows best.

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